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Material finder

How will a new material behave in a particular manufacturing process or when used in a specific application? How can existing production steps be optimised?

Initial answers to these questions can be found here. Working together with universities and specialist institutes, we have tested our high-strength and higher strength special steels in order to determine their suitability for different manufacturing processes. The results are contained in our material finder,
which can help you identify the ideal material and materials processing technology for your specific needs.

Material
Process
ETG® 88/100
HSX® 90*
HSX® 110
HSX® 130*
HSX® Z10
HSX® Z12*
Machining
The special production processes used for ETG® steels result in steels that offer a unique combination of high strength and outstanding machinability. ETG® steels produce short-breaking chips when machined and they exhibit a high degree of uniformity of material properties across batches.

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The special production process used for HSX® Z12 results in a steel that offers a unique combination of high strength and very good machinability. HSX® Z12 produces shortbreaking chips when machined and exhibits a high degree of uniformity of material properties across batches.

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Low distortion
The ETG® steels from Steeltec offer customers a very wide range of options for designing their production processes. As ETG® steels already exhibit high strength when supplied to customers, they do not need to undergo further processing such as hardening, straightening, grinding and deburring. ETG® steels are produced with low levels of residual stress and retain excellent dimensionally stable even when used in the manufacture of asymmetrical components. Even long, spindle-shaped components can be machined to within very tight geometrical and positional tolerances.

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The bainitic special steel HSX® exhibits low levels of residual stress. By carefully controlling production process parameters, the physical and mechanical properties of HSX® 90 can be adjusted to meet the needs of specific applications, such as strict requirements concerning a component`s dimensional stability.

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The ferrite-pearlite special steel HSX® 110 is supplied to customers with a strength already equal to that of Q and T steels. By carefully controlling the drawing process, HSX® 110 is manufactured with low residual stress, making it suitable for parts requiring high strength and superior dimensional

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Even its as-delivered state, the special bainitic steel HSX® 130 exhibits a minimum tensile strength of 1250 MPa. Because the drawing processes is carefully controlled, HSX® 130 is manufactured with low residual stress, making it suitable for parts requiring high strength and superior dimensional stability.

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The ferrite-pearlite special steel HSX® Z10 is supplied to customers with a strength already equal to that of Q and T steels. By carefully controlling the drawing process, HSX® Z10 is manufactured with low residual stress, making it suitable for parts requiring high strength and superior dimensional stability.

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HSX® Z12 exhibits low levels of residual stress. It is suitable for components that need to fulfil strict requirements regarding their strength and dimensional stability. Additional operations such as straightening and grinding can be dispensed with.

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Induction hardening
When delivered to customers, ETG® steels already have a mechanical strength similar to that of quenched and tempered steels, which means that in most cases subsequent heat treatment is not required. If increased wear resistance or fatigue strength is required, a range of surface hardening techniques can be applied. While nitriding methods can be used, the predominant technique is induction hardening. The high base strength of the ETG® steels guarantees a good substrate microstructure and thus provides ideal conditions for HF induction hardening. If treated at temperatures of between 840°C and 870°C and then quenched in oil or in a special emulsion, surface hardness values in the range 50-55 HRC can be achieved.

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In its as-delivered state HSX® 110 already has a mechanical strength similar to that of quenched and tempered steels, so that in most cases subsequent heat treatment is not required. If increased wear resistance or fatigue strength is required, a range of surface hardening techniques can be used. The high base strength of HSX® 110 steel guarantees a good substrate microstructure and thus provides ideal conditions for HF induction hardening. If HSX® 110 is treated at temperatures of between 820°C and 870°C and then quenched in oil or in a special emulsion, surface hardness values in the range 50-55 HRC can be achieved.

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In its as-delivered state HSX® Z10 already has a mechanical strength similar to that of quenched and tempered steels, so that in most cases subsequent heat treatment is not necessary. However, if increased wear resistance or fatigue strength is required, a range of surface hardening techniques can be used. The high base strength of HSX® Z10 steel guarantees a good substrate microstructure and thus provides ideal conditions for HF induction hardening. If HSX® Z10 is treated at temperatures of between 880°C and 980°C and then quenched in a special emulsion, surface hardness values of up to 55 HRC can be achieved.

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Nitrocarburising
HSX® 90 exhibits a very compact compound layer with little pore formation. Layer thicknesses of between 6 µm and 10 µm can be achieved after nitriding at 520°C for 10 hours or at 570°C for 4 hours. After gas nitriding at 520°C for 10 hours, the thickness of the case-hardened layer was determined to be 0.42 mm. The core hardness in this case was 270 HV/0.5 and the case hardness was measured to be 650 HV/0.5. After nitriding at 570°C for 4 hours, the yield strength (at 0.2 % offset) was found to have decreased slightly by about 10 %.

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In its as-delivered state HSX® 110 already has a mechanical strength similar to that of quenched and tempered steels, so that in most cases subsequent heat treatment is not required. However, if there is a need for increased wear resistance, this can be achieved, for example, by plasma nitrocarburising. Treating the material at a temperature in the range 480°C to 510°C for a period of between 20 and 36 hours can create a compound layer with a thickness of up to 10 µm. The base strength is lowered by about ten percent.

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HSX® 130 exhibits a very compact compound layer with little pore formation. Layer thicknesses of between 6 µm and 10 µm can be achieved after nitriding at 520°C for 10 hours or at 570°C for 4 hours. After gas nitriding at 520°C for 10 hours, the thickness of the case-hardened layer was determined to be 0.25 mm. The core hardness in this case was 317 HV/0.5 and the case hardness was measured to be 520 HV/0.5. Nitriding can result in a reduction of about 25 % in the yield strength (at 0.2 % offset).

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In its as-delivered state HSX® Z10 already has a mechanical strength similar to that of quenched and tempered steels, so that in most cases subsequent heat treatment is not required. However, if increased wear resistance is required, this can be achieved, for example, by nitrocarburising. Treating the material at a temperature of 520°C for between 10 and 40 hours creates a nitriding layer with a thickness of between 0.33 mm and 0.55 mm. The base strength is lowered by about ten percent.

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HSX® Z12 exhibits a very compact compound layer with little pore formation. Layer thicknesses of between 6 µm and 10 µm can be achieved after nitriding at 520°C for 10 hours or at 570°C for 4 hours. After gas nitriding at 520°C for 10 hours, the thickness of the case-hardened layer was determined to be 0.25 mm. The core hardness in this case was 317 HV/0.5 and the case hardness was measured to be 520 HV/0.5.

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Cold formability
HSX® 90 is a microalloyed bainitic special steel with a carbon content of less than 0.1 %. Its material properties make it very suitable for cold forming processes such as thread rolling, bending or flanging, and for a range of surface hardening techniques.

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Dynamic strength
The high strength exhibited by HSX® 110 makes it particularly suitable for parts that need to be able to withstand high static and dynamic forces. The material has an endurance limit of 485 MPa under tensile-compressive loading, and of 515 MPa when subjected to alternating bending stresses. Smith and Haigh diagrams and S-N curves can be provided to assist with engineering design calculations.

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The outstanding strength characteristics of HSX® 130 make it particularly suitable for parts that need to be able to cope with high static and dynamic forces. The material has an endurance limit of 545 MPa under tensile-compressive loading, and of 585 MPa when subjected to alternating bending stresses. Smith and Haigh diagrams and S-N curves can be provided to assist with engineering design calculations.


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The high strength exhibited by HSX® Z10 makes it particularly suitable for parts that need to be able to withstand high static and dynamic forces. The material has an endurance limit of 410 MPa under tensile-compressive loading, and of 415 MPa when subjected to alternating bending stresses. Smith and Haigh diagrams and S-N curves can be provided to assist with engineering design calculations.

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The outstanding strength characteristics of HSX® Z12 make it particularly suitable for parts that need to be able to cope with high static and dynamic forces. The material has an endurance limit of 485 MPa under tensile-compressive loading, and of 525 MPa when subjected to alternating bending stresses. Smith and Haigh diagrams and S-N curves can be provided to assist with engineering design calculations.


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Weldability
As a high-strength, low carbon equivalent special steel, HSX® 90 is especially well-suited for welding applications, in which metal parts are joined by the processes of melting and fusing. Laser beam welding is often the welding method of choice in industrial manufacturing settings where strict demands are placed on quality and efficiency. HSX® 90 exhibits a high-strength, tough weld zone structure consisting of a lower-bainite and cubic martensite microstructure.

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As a high-strength, low carbon equivalent special steel, HSX® Z10 is especially well-suited for welding applications, in which metal parts are joined by the processes of melting and fusing. Laser beam welding is often the welding method of choice in industrial manufacturing settings where strict demands are placed on quality and efficiency.

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Toughness
Thanks to its excellent toughness, HSX® 90 can be used to manufacture components that will be subjected to a combination of static and dynamic loads, such as parts that have to transmit large forces while also withstanding high impact stresses. Examples of such components include those used in hydraulic systems or those that experience high compressive loading. Furthermore, as the material`s properties show good isotropy, HSX® 90 has a high resistance to transverse loads.

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Thanks to its excellent toughness, HSX® 130 can be used to manufacture components that will be subjected to a combination of static and dynamic loads, such as parts that have to transmit large forces while also withstanding high impact stresses. Examples of such components include those used in hydraulic systems or those that experience high compressive loading.

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Even in its as-delivered state, HSX® Z10 offers customers a good combination of material strength and toughness. Its physical and mechanical properties make it particularly suitable for the manufacture of thin-walled components. HSX® Z10 can also be used to fabricate parts that are subject to transverse stresses or to high internal pressures.

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Thanks to its excellent toughness, HSX® Z12 can be used to manufacture components that will be subjected to a combination of static and dynamic loads such as parts that have to transmit large forces while also withstanding high impact stresses. Examples of such components include those used in hydraulic systems or those that experience high compressive loading.

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0,2% - Yield strength
HSX® 130 exhibits a very high minimum yield strength (at 0.2 % offset) of 1200 MPa. It is particularly well suited for manufacturing highly stressed precision components that have to meet strict requirements regarding design tolerances and dimensional stability.

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* HSX® 90/130/Z12 are bainitic materials